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April 12, 2015 5:00 pm - NewsBehavingBadly.com

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The New York cab driver is being fined for telling a lesbian couple who were kissing in the back of his cab to “keep that behavior in the bedroom.”

Mohammed Dahbi discriminated against actress Kassie Thornton and her TV executive partner Christy Spitzer after ordering them to ‘keep that behavior for the bedroom’.

He warned that if they ignored his request during the trip on September 18, 2011, he would throw them out.

When they got out, Dahbi also called the pair ‘b*****’, ‘c****’ and ‘whores’ after they refused to pay the fare and walked away.

He claimed during the city’s Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings¬†they were ‘touching each other all over’ and ‘kissing heavily’ .

But according to DNAinfo New York, Judge John Spooner disagreed and ordered him to pay the fine.

He also made him attend anti-discrimination training and pay a $5,000 civil penalty to the city.

Ms Spitzer told the news website: ‘We felt that what happened to us was wrong and he needed to take responsibility for his actions.

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D.B. Hirsch
D.B. Hirsch is a political activist, news junkie, and retired ad copy writer and spin doctor. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

15 responses to Cabbie Ordered To Pay $10,000 For Stopping Lesbian Kiss

  1. granpa.usthai April 12th, 2015 at 6:17 pm

    next time video, dumbass. If it’s not permissible in court, at least you could get enough on the black market to pay the penalties and/or have some fun time at home behind pulled curtains with nobody watching.
    so- who’s your favorite little rascal?

  2. burqa April 12th, 2015 at 7:00 pm

    I need video.

    • Robert M. Snyder April 13th, 2015 at 10:40 am

      So do I, because this cabbie may have been wronged. As I see it, there are two separate issues:

      1. Gays and lesbians should be treated the same as straights.

      2. Some behaviors are not appropriate in public.

      Let me use some extreme examples: People should not urinate, defecate, or have sex in cabs. Urination, defecation, and sex are perfectly natural behaviors. But if anyone (gay, lesbian, or straight) initiates in those behaviors in my cab, and refuses to stop, I will throw them out.

      If I were the judge in this case, I would want to know if these women were merely kissing, or if they were groping, fondling, and getting all twitterpated. Because there is a point at which a line is crossed, and the cabbie has a right to say “Get a room.”.

      A lot of school buses now have video cameras. If I were this cabbie, I would think about putting one in my cab.

      • burqa April 14th, 2015 at 9:16 pm

        Good points. It may well be that the cabbie doesn’t permit heteros to make out in his cab, either.

        • Robert M. Snyder April 14th, 2015 at 10:57 pm

          Whenever I am speaking with someone who expresses disapproval of homosexuality, I ask them to explain why it bothers them. Some people go right to the Bible and start talking about sin. I don’t know how to make progress with someone like that. But in the majority of cases, what bothers people are behaviors such as anonymous sex with many different partners, or sexually explicit behavior in public. So my immediate comeback is “Do straight people engage in those same behaviors, and does that bother you too?”. The answer is almost always “yes”.

          I believe in serial monogamy, and I think that “hooking-up” with a different person every night is a terrible idea, regardless of whether you are gay or straight. I believe that groping and fondling should be done in private, not in public places, regardless of whether you are gay or straight. I think that re-enacting an S&M ritual while marching in a public parade where children might be present is disgusting, regardless of whether you are gay or straight.

          Most of the people I know have no serious objection to gays or lesbians marrying and leading respectable lives. The confusion comes when some gays and some lesbians engage in behaviors that are not respectable. A lot of people incorrectly associate those behaviors with homosexuality, and need to be reminded that a lot of straights engage in the same behaviors, and that it is just as objectionable when straights do it.

          There is nothing gay about one-night stands and using people for sex (i.e. objectification). On any given night, there are far more straights than gays doing that.

          Accepting gays and lesbians does not require you to accept everything that some gays and lesbians do. You can be accepting of gays and still be critical of things like “hooking up” and inappropriate behavior in public spaces, as long as you are criticizing the behaviors themselves.

          If you are marching in a parade in my town, and your bare ass is on display for children to see, I don’t care whether you’re gay, lesbian, straight, or completely asexual. I don’t want to see your silly ass parading in front of the children in my community. We can disagree about precisely what is appropriate in public, but virtually everyone would agree that there are certain boundaries that should be respected, regardless of whether you are gay or straight.

          • burqa April 15th, 2015 at 9:58 pm

            Ask them how they can claim to love their neighbor when they insist their neighbor be denied rights they enjoy.
            Public displays of affection can go overboard, but I can’t recall the last time I witnessed anything more than a quick kiss.
            If other people want to hook up, I don’t care one bit. I have had a number of one night stands and done plenty of fornication with girlfriends and just as it is no one’s business, so it is with what others do. I don’t have an opinion on what others do because I only think about it when someone else brings it up.
            Part of the problem is people spend too much time worrying about what others do in private. Just leave-em alone, I say.

            If offensive behavior takes place in public, that’s another thing.

          • Robert M. Snyder April 15th, 2015 at 11:01 pm

            Everything you said makes sense, but it has been said many times before and I just don’t think it is effective at changing hearts and minds. If we really want to influence people, I think we need to examine what motivates their concerns.

            In my own life, there was a time when I associated homosexuality with exhibitionism, cruising for anonymous sex, etc. It has taken me a long time to break that association and realize that it is the behaviors that bother me, not the homosexuality.

            I am not a nosy neighbor. I do not concern myself with what specific individuals are doing. But my wife and I have raised two children, and part of that responsibility involved having discussions about morality. We never told them that homosexuality was wrong, because we don’t believe that. But we did try to give them a sense of personal responsibility and civic duty. We tried to demonstrate, through our words and deeds, our own belief in modesty, moderation, respect for others, etc.

            Many times, mostly at the dinner table, our kids would mention situations that happened at school, or issues that were being discussed in class. So as parents, we felt that it was our duty to help our kids see these issues from multiple perspectives.

            My wife was raised in a Catholic, Democratic, blue collar household. I was raised in a Protestant, Republican, white collar household. Our relationship has thrived because we are both able to appreciate other perspectives. We naturally wanted to encourage our kids to do that as well.

            But there are also many issues on which my wife and I strongly agree. The wisdom of serial monogamy is one of those issues. Taking responsibility for the consequences of one’s actions is another. We made it very clear to our children that “hooking-up” with a person you barely know is a very bad idea. And we told both of them that they should never have sex with someone they would not want to marry, because no birth control is perfect, and every kid deserves to grow up with two loving parents if at all possible.

            When you’re a parent, it forces you to explore your own beliefs, because your children are asking questions and expecting good advice. It forces you to question the things that you were taught as a child. And it causes you to realize that your own parents probably questioned a lot of the things they were taught when you were a child asking them questions.

            So when I examined my own beliefs, I discovered that I was equating homosexuality with a lot of bad behaviors, such as cruising and hook-ups, which really have nothing in particular to do with homosexuality. I discovered that it was the behaviors, not the orientation of the people, that I found objectionable.

            But it took me a long time to get there. So when I’m interacting with someone who seems to be associating homosexuality with a lot of bad behaviors, I ask them to think about a heterosexual person engaging in the same behaviors. I want to help them to see that while their concern about those behaviors is perfectly valid, their equating those behaviors with homosexuality is not valid. If I can get them to see that, then maybe that one person will be a little more accepting of gays and lesbians.

            My goal in all of this is to help increase understanding. If someone would have asked me to separate those issues when I was a young person, maybe I would have gotten there a lot sooner. But I didn’t get there by accepting the proposition that hooking up for one-night stands is something to be celebrated. I got there by separating the two issues of sexual orientation and objectionable behaviors that are just as common among straights as among gays.

          • burqa April 15th, 2015 at 11:37 pm

            With other people, we just have to keep working with them if they are willing to talk about it, but there are also times when we just can’t discuss such things.

            My best friend since high school is conservative in his political beliefs. We pretty much avoid politics, but sometimes something comes up. What we do is each of us makes a couple comments and then we move on to something else, because our friendship is more important.

            Many people today are coming around to respecting gays as equal but it is taking others more time to come around. I’m old enough to remember the civil rights movement and the women’s liberation movement that followed. In both cases it took people time to get used to the new paradigm. They were used to all-white news broadcasts on TV and would feel unsettled when they began to integrate. Oh man, there might have been millions faint back then had they seen a current broadcast of Sports center or something where there are times when just about everyone on stage is black.

            All the fears of what would happen if there were numerous African Americans in any aspect of life have been proven to be bogus. Same with those about men being unable to work for a female boss, say.

            45 years ago Fox would have been the last network to put black, brown or female faces on the air, but now look at their on-air talent.

            A few lines from the following song come to mind,

            “People ought to live how and where they want,
            People ought to have respect in front,
            People ought to get along pretty ok….”

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73KIAEAwiWc

        • Robert M. Snyder April 14th, 2015 at 10:57 pm

          Whenever I am speaking with someone who expresses disapproval of homosexuality, I ask them to explain why it bothers them. Some people go right to the Bible and start talking about sin. I don’t know how to make progress with someone like that. But in the majority of cases, what bothers people are behaviors such as anonymous sex with many different partners, or sexually explicit behavior in public. So my immediate comeback is “Do straight people engage in those same behaviors, and does that bother you too?”. The answer is almost always “yes”.

          I believe in serial monogamy, and I think that “hooking-up” with a different person every night is a terrible idea, regardless of whether you are gay or straight. I believe that groping and fondling should be done in private, not in public places, regardless of whether you are gay or straight. I think that re-enacting an S&M ritual while marching in a public parade where children might be present is disgusting, regardless of whether you are gay or straight.

          Most of the people I know have no serious objection to gays or lesbians marrying and leading respectable lives. The confusion comes when some gays and some lesbians engage in behaviors that are not respectable. A lot of people incorrectly associate those behaviors with homosexuality, and need to be reminded that a lot of straights engage in the same behaviors, and that it is just as objectionable when straights do it.

          There is nothing gay about one-night stands and using people for sex (i.e. objectification). On any given night, there are far more straights than gays doing that.

          Accepting gays and lesbians does not require you to accept everything that some gays and lesbians do. You can be accepting of gays and still be critical of things like “hooking up” and inappropriate behavior in public spaces, as long as you are criticizing the behaviors themselves.

          If you are marching in a parade in my town, and your bare ass is on display for children to see, I don’t care whether you’re gay, lesbian, straight, or completely asexual. I don’t want to see your silly ass parading in front of the children in my community. We can disagree about precisely what is appropriate in public, but virtually everyone would agree that there are certain boundaries that should be respected, regardless of whether you are gay or straight.

      • Um Cara April 14th, 2015 at 9:37 pm

        A lot of school buses now have video cameras. If I were this cabbie, I would think about putting one in my cab.

        Many cabs do have video cameras. And I agree he has the right to ask people not to suck face in his cab. I’m not shocked that he was rude. I’ve had hundreds of rude cab drivers in my lifetime (though I’ve had more kind or neutral drivers than rude).

        Also, assuming he dropped them off where they wanted to go – why didn’t they pay their fare? Sounds like theft to me. I’m mighty pro-gay rights, but I’m also mighty pro-working man. It sounds like that’s when he really went off the deep end.

        • Robert M. Snyder April 14th, 2015 at 9:45 pm

          Yep, and now this working man has to pay a $10K fine out of his after-tax income.

  3. CHOCOL8MILK April 12th, 2015 at 7:29 pm

    In Japan, guys pay good money for this type of scenario.

  4. Ronald L April 14th, 2015 at 9:55 pm

    Here in Portland, we had a cabbie throw a lesbian couple out of his car. (I’m pretty sure he slowed down first.)

    That was a couple of years ago. I think they should sue.